Skip Navigation

Glen A. Laine

Glen A. Laine

Director
Michael E. DeBakey Institute for Comparative Cardiovascular Science and Biomedical Devices
Texas A&M University

Professor
Veterinarian Medicine & Biomedical Sciences
Texas A&M University

He is holder of the Wiseman-Lewie-Worth Endowed Chair in Cardiology. Dr. Laine is also a Senior Fellow of the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Pandemic and Biosecurity Program at the Bush School of Government and Public Service. He served in the United States Army from 1967 through 1969.  He began his academic career as a microbiologist working with various infectious agents and their impact on human Physiology.

Dr. Laine expanded his graduate education into biophysics and biomedical engineering by applying basic principles of physical science to complex medical problems. He spent a decade in a clinical department of anesthesiology and critical care medicine in the Texas Medical Center before returning to Texas A&M as Department Head of Physiology, Pharmacology and Toxicology for 20 years.

Dr. Laine served as the Vice President for Research at Texas A&M leading unprecedented growth in research expenditures.  As Vice President, he initiated the design and construction of the Biosafety Level-3 AG biocontainment facility. This facility accommodates the chronic study of high consequence infectious diseases along with the vectors responsible for transmission of disease in animals and humans. 

As director of the DeBakey Institute for the past 20 years, he has published extensively in the medical and biomedical engineering literature on fluid resuscitation and edema formation in trauma patients while setting clinical standards for central venous and peritoneal pressure monitoring in patients with abdominal compartment syndrome from over fluid resuscitation.  He has maintained research funding for over 40 years and trained generations of undergraduate, professional and graduate students.  Dr. Laine‚Äôs diverse background led him to a significant interest in potential pandemics resulting from either intentional (bioterrorism) or accidental release of microorganisms genetically modified utilizing techniques common to the emerging discipline of synthetic biology.  This includes the policies needed to ensure appropriate preparation, response and recovery in a resilient society.